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Member tour of the Commonwealth Museum to discuss Massachusetts' suffrage efforts and to explore the Townshend Acts exhibit.

3:00 pm
-
November 15, 2019
Commonwealth Museum
$15
Free
Tickets

Description

In honor of the 100th anniversary of national women’s suffrage, we’re visiting the Commonwealth Museum to learn about Massachusetts’ push for the vote. Fredie Kay, Founder and President of the Women’s Suffrage Celebration Coalition of Massachusetts will speak about their partnership with the museum to present “Suffragist of the Month”display panels from August 2017 through August 2020, the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment. The exhibit panels highlight notable events, and individuals whose contribution paved the way for equal voting rights for all.

We’ll go back in time to explore the colonial foundations of Massachusetts with Museum Director Stephen Kenney. The home of Massachusetts’ history, the Commonwealth Museum houses iconic artwork and foundation documents. The lead up to the War of Independence is represented in “Road to Revolution: the Occupation of Boston” exhibit. The colonists who gathered at the Meeting House on December 16th were directly incited by the Tea Act of 1773, but resentment over tea had been brewing for years. Taxing tea for the express purpose of raising revenue began with the Townshend Acts of 1767. This sweeping economic legislation set the tone for Parliament’s colonial dealings for the next decade. Within a year, Bostonians’ resistance to the Townshend Acts had brought British warships into the harbor and troops into the streets. Delve into the politics and protests of the Townshend Acts as we gear up for the Boston Tea Party Reenactment!

Tickets are $15 for members and their guests. To reserve your place, please email rwilbur@osmh.org or call (617) 482-6439 ext. 23.

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